Photography

8 Tips for “WOW” Portrait Photography

The following tips on portrait photography were gotten from interviews with the professionals of the field:

Exportrait photographyperiment with Perspective

The study guide for Berkshire based portrait photography is to capture shots at the eye level. Most professionals stick to this guideline and although it does not cause any harm, trying to deviate from the standard norm can be creative. After all, life is all about new experiences and the only way to learn is by trying or experimenting with new things. Try finding new perspective that go beyond the eye level.

Look Away v. Eye Contact

In Berkshire based portrait photography, you may find that there is often the discussion of which style gives off the best look. They both have their merits as having the model look away from the camera creates a certain type of intrigue while for eye contact, it delivers a bold message.

Be conscious of the frame

Having awareness of the frame is all a part of composition that comes with experience but this does not take away from the fact that for some, it is the most important element of Berkshire based portrait photography. The proper framing of the objects does not mean everything has to occur or be arranged in the object. It means having people catch the major story of an image from just a mere glance.

Composition

There is a certain rule known as rule of thirds in photography and it would be wise to get accustomed to it as it becomes particularly useful in portrait photography. This rule encourages moving the subject of the shoot to the side of the frame to create different impressions.

Experiment with Lighting

Another experiment on this list of tips and it involves lighting. Making reference to the past experiment which encourages trying out new things as you never know what you may discover, in this case lighting is the catalyst of any image and the right use of it makes your portrait transcend from good to amazing. The good thing is lighting does not have any specific rules it has to abide by as it requires common sense more than anything else. If you find that you feel comfortable with a particular setting for your lighting then it is right.

Leave your comfort zone

Just one of many tips that encourages experimenting. Most portrait photographers require their models to be still and unmoving but why not try something different instead of a fixed pose? Movement brings about a certain fluidity that is natural. Capturing your model in motion brings about the snapshot effect which gives a lasting impression of the portrait.

Take advantage of the environment

The environment itself provides you with relevant props to achieve your aims like telling whatever story you need to get passed to your audience. Anything from a stone, tree branch, fork can be used to enhance the image.

Placing focus on a certain part does not take away from the whole

There are certain assumptions in portrait photography that the whole object has to be captured but that is not the case. In some case, focusing on a certain part delivers better than focusing on the whole. Instead of going for the full body effect, try focusing on maybe a tattoo on the shoulder, a beauty mark on the face etc.